BOROBUDUR BY DAY

I’ve seen my fair share of gorgeous churches and mosques around the world, but I think my favorite historical religious sites to explore are temples.  I just love the details they work into these massive stone havens they often build in the middle of jungles.  Thousands upon thousands of heavy brick stones hand laid and meticulously carved amid mosquitoes, humidity, and exhaustion…so impressive!  I just can’t even fathom how they managed to create such a masterpiece so long ago. And that goes for all ruins: Ephesus, The Acropolis, Pompeii, etc.

The UNESCO World Heritage site of Borobudur is no exception.  We bumped along for over two hours in a cramped bus from Semarang to get there, but it was worth it.  Compared to sites like Angkor Wat, the size is alarmingly small, but it was such a humidly hot day that small was more than welcome.

“Borobudur, or Barabudur, is a 9th-century Mahayana Buddhist Temple in Magelang, Central Java, Indonesia. The monument consists of nine stacked platforms, six square and three circular, topped by a central dome. The temple is decorated with 2,672 relief panels and 504 Buddha statues. The central dome is surrounded by 72 Buddha statues, each seated inside a perforated stupa.[1] It is the world’s largest Buddhist temple,[2][3] as well as one of the greatest Buddhist monuments in the world.[4] …Borobudur has the largest and most complete ensemble of Buddhist reliefs in the world.[4]Thanks Wikipedia!

It’s a very photogenic space, hence all of these gorgeous shots!

Since I am now in the market of selling photos through Etsy, if you see a photo below that tickles your fancy, let me know (don’t hesitate) and we can add it to the shop.  REMEMBER: yours will be full-sized, not these tiny guys!

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3 responses to “BOROBUDUR BY DAY

  1. Wow, so amazing! It makes me wonder what we are leaving for someone to explore in 500 years. Not much, is probably the answer.

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